ENOUGH FOOD FOR EVERY FAMILY IS OUR PRIDE

By Benedicto Hosea – Project Leader

We started our “Enough Food for Everyone” campaign to ensure all families have nutritious food to improve the health of the one of the most impoverished societies on the earth.

Previously in Zeze people struggled to grow enough to eat.  However your donations and support has transformed Zeze society as it is now able to feed itself. From November 2016 to June 2017, we have produced more than 218 tons of food mainly Maize.

Christopher and his wife Modesta have been married for more than 24 years and have 5 children. Previously not able to succeed in farming due to poor farming methods and lack of good seeds. They have lived in grass thatched house all of their lives. “We are all very happy with this programme because we have extra food for feeding ourselves and selling to improve our house. I have never harvested 22 sacks (2200kgs) of maize in my life but I have more than these harvests on only one acre in this season”. Christopher said.

Benedicto is working hard in his society to stand as a role model in adapting Zeze community to adapt sustainable farming and development. “I want to show our society that it is possible to change. These harvests are a demonstration to the unknown, unobserved and unsupported societies that they can make the difference that will make other persons trust change is possible”.

Honorata is a woman married to Juma and they are four in the family. She made unbelievable achievement in maize farming and harves

ting for food and for cash. “I have harvested a half of my farm and I have already plucked 56 buckets (11 sacks) of maize seeds, I am harvesting the same amount too. I will not sell the extra (60 buckets) when the bucket will be sold at 20,000Tshs and the money I will make, will help me improve my house and expand my farm

These few stories represent all the farmers who have cultivated, planted and harvested maize at Zeze village this season. Zeze community has also planted 625 palm trees planting as part of a climate change adaptation project, as well as 1600 fruit trees including oranges, mangoes, guavas, avocados and others which we know by their local names.  The world can be a better place if we can make it sufficiently productive to provide food for everyone.


Christopher and Modesta

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Microfinance in Zeze

20150815_175617In August I spent a week in Zeze village and met the chair, vice chair and secretary of the microfinance group, as well as many of the women who have received loans.

I  also visited many of them in their homes and businesses and spoke to the Village Chairman, Village Executive Officer, and chair of MVG, who are running the scheme who all confirmed the positive impact the scheme is having on the village.

20150815_175301Petronia had her loan in May, thanks to a new injection of funds from Wabia. She buys palm oil from farmers in the fields and resells it in the market, making approx. £8 profit per week.  Recently her 8 month baby started excreting blood and she was able to take her to the doctors and buy medicine.  Without her business she said she would have been unable to do that.

Pendo buys petrol in large containers and decants it into litre bottles which she sells in the market and on the road.  Her profits mean that she is able to pay for her son, who was unemployed, to study to be a mechanic.

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Edita received her loan last month.  She is making bible covers for 80p that she sells for £1 in Kasulu, the town 40 km away that she visits twice a week.  She had sold 40 to a shop there the previous day.  She is saving to purchase a second sewing machine so her husband can also make them at the same time.  She also wants to branch into mpesa (mobile money)

Josrene had an initial £18 loan which she repaid,  then a £50 loan in May.  She collects maize and beans from farmers in the field and then grinds flour and then sells in bulk to buyers from Kigoma.  She is saving to build a bigger house for her family with larger storage capacities as she wants to sell wholesale directly in Kigoma in the future.

20150818_173509Godliva had a second loan in June.  She also sells beans and maize, but also soap. She gets a profit of 80p  per box for this.  She is saving money to get a soap factory so she can make her own soap.  This would cost £120 but she estimates it would bring her “20 a week profit.

What was generally striking was the pride with which the women talked about their businesses.  They have noticeably grown in confidence since I met them in January, and have a higher status in their family and in the village as a whole. Originally I was told that there was resistance from some men in the village, concerned that women getting loans would be a threat to their authority.

20150818_180652Now the same men ask Benedicto when their wives can get a loan.  It was touching to see a number of the women working closely with their husbands as partners in the business, whereas previously they worked much more separately. This appears to have had a positive effect on their relationships, which was confirmed by the women themselves. In the training women were told “Don’t use your loan to exploit your husband, rather money should be a tool for strengthening the love in your family”.   They seem to have taken this to heart!